» » Florida Name Change Forms – How to Change Your Name in FL

Florida Name Change Forms – How to Change Your Name in FL

The Florida name change forms are documents used to legally request a name change for a person residing in the State. These forms may be used by an adult who wishes to change their own name or by an adult attempting to change the name of a child in their custody. All filings will be submitted to a clerk of the circuit court operating within the applicant’s county of residence. After the request has been processed, a hearing will be scheduled during which a judge will review the applicant’s reason for the request to change their name or the request to change their child’s name. The judge will then determine whether or not the request shall be granted.

Laws § 68.07

Table of Contents

Name Change After Marriage

When filling out your marriage license application, enter a new last name in the area designated for the spouse’s general personal information. You must then mention your maiden surname in the next available space. This process will notify the court of your intention to change your name. Once your marriage is legal, the original marriage certificate, or copy which has been certified by the court, is all that’s needed to prove that your name has changed.

Name Change After Divorce

Indicate your desire to change your name during the court proceedings for your divorce. There will be a paragraph within the dissolution papers which will be used for this purpose. When your divorce is completed, you will receive a divorce decree that can be used as legal documentation of your name change. However, this process only applies if you are restoring your name to the one used prior to your marriage. Changing your name to anything other than your former name will require you to file the standard paperwork for an adult name change (see below).

Adult Name Change (No Marriage or Divorce)

Requesting a name change as an adult can be executed by filing a petition with the circuit court in your county. The purpose of the petition will be to inform a judge of the name change and the reasoning behind it. Additionally, you must submit a state and national fingerprint-based criminal background check to the circuit court before you can request a hearing for your case.

Step 1 – Background Check

Unless you are attempting to restore your former name, you will need to submit a state and national fingerprint-based background check to the circuit court. Contact the Department of Law Enforcement to locate a law enforcement agency or service provider authorized to submit electronic fingerprints to the Department. Next, go to the agency or service provider to have your fingerprints recorded. Both background checks demand the payment of a processing fee (contact the agency in advance to determine the amount).

You may need to wait several weeks before receiving the results of your state and national background checks. After receiving your results, make copies for your personal records.

Step 2 – Disclosure from Nonlawyer

If a person is helping you fill out your change of name request, that person must complete a Disclosure From Nonlawyer form before assisting you. This individual will further be known as the “nonlawyer.” After the form has been completed by the nonlawyer, provide your signature on the “Signature of Party” line. Have several copies of the form made for your records.

Step 3 – Petition for Change of Name

Download the Petition for Change of Name (Adult) and fill in the applicable lines. The judicial court and case information at the top of the form may be obtained from a court clerk when you submit the petition. Do not sign the document until further requested. If a nonlawyer has helped you fill out the petition, they must complete the bottommost area of the form.

Step 4 – Sign in the Presence of a Notary Public

Sign your Petition for Change of Name (Adult) in front of a notary public. The services of a notary public can often be employed for free at a local bank or credit union, though you may be required to pay a small fee depending on their business policy. A clerk of the circuit court can also provide this service for you when you file your petition. Make several copies of the form after it has been signed in front of a notary public or another official.

Step 5 – Submit Filings to the Circuit Court

Go to the circuit court in your county during normal business hours and submit your filings to a clerk. The clerk will ask you to pay a filing fee for the service. Although the fee will vary depending on your county of residence, expect to pay a filing fee of approximately $200 to $300. After submitting your filings, ask the clerk to schedule your hearing.

Step 6 – Final Judgement of Change of Name

Download the Final Judgement of Change of Name (Adult). This document will be signed by a judge after your request for a change of name has been approved. Fill out the applicable lines of the form prior to attending your hearing.

Step 7 – Attend Hearing

Attend your hearing on the arranged date and time. Be sure to bring the Final Judgement of Change of Name (Adult). When your case number is called, provide the judge with the Final Judgement form and answer any questions that the judge might have. If the judge approves your request for a change of name, the judge will sign the Final Judgement form and return it to you. Complete the process by filing the Final Judgement with a court clerk and request certified copies (additional fees may apply). Make several copies of the form and keep them for your personal records.

Driver’s License

The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) cannot update the name on your driver’s license unless you have reported the new name to the Social Security Administration (SSA). Therefore, before proceeding, you must submit the Application for a Social Security Card to the SSA and obtain a new social security card.

After reporting your new name to the SSA, visit a Florida DHSMV location and request an updated driver’s license. They will ask you to provide an original or certified copy of the following documents:

  • Florida driver’s license or ID card
  • Proof of U.S. citizenship or legal presence
  • Proof of name change
  • Proof of social security number
  • Proof of legal residency

Go to the DHSMV website for a complete list of accepted documents.

Pay the $25 processing fee to complete the process. The DHSMV will then provide you with a new driver’s license showing your new name.

Voter Registration

Updating the name on your voter registration can be accomplished one of two ways; visit the Florida Department of State webpage to change your name online, or submit a new Voter Registration Form in person or by mail to the County Supervisor of Elections. If updating in person or by mail, indicate that your name has changed by selecting “Record Update/Change (e.g., Address, Party Affiliation, Name, Signature)” located just above section (1) on the form.

Minor (Child) Name Change

The process of changing a minor’s name in Florida is slightly more complicated than the standard filing procedure for an adult. In addition to filing a written petition with the circuit court, you will need to obtain the written consent of the other parent unless you and the other parent have decided to file together. The process becomes even more convoluted if the other parent disagrees with your decision to change the child’s name. In these instances, it may be best to contact an attorney to determine the best way to proceed.

Step 1 – Background Check

Unless you are seeking to restore the child’s former name, you and the other parent (if applicable) will need to submit a state and fingerprint criminal background check to the circuit court. Locate a law enforcement agency or service provider designated by the Department of Law Enforcement to record fingerprints. Visit the location and pay the processing fee to have your fingerprints taken. The agency will then conduct the criminal history check and return the results to you by mail. Make several copies of the results and keep them for your personal records.

Step 2 – Disclosure from Nonlawyer

If you are filing the name change request with the assistance of another person who is not a lawyer (referred to as a “nonlawyer”), the individual must complete the Disclosure From Nonlawyer form. Once completed, provide your signature above the “Signature of Party” line and print several copies of the form.

Step 3 – Petition for Change of Name

Download the Petition for Change of Name (Minor Child(ren)) and fill in all fields of the form excluding the area designated for the notary public/court clerk and the area designated for the nonlawyer. DO NOT sign the document. If a nonlawyer has assisted you in filling out the petition, the individual must provide their personal information in the applicable spaces of the form.

You will need to sign the completed petition in the presence of a notary public or a clerk of the court. Print several copies of the form once completed and signed.

Step 4 – File with the Circuit Court

Go to the circuit court in the child’s county of residence and submit your filings to a court clerk. Included with your submission must be the following:

  • National and state background check results
  • Disclosure From Nonlawyer (if applicable)
  • Petition for Change of Name (Minor Child(ren))
  • Payment for the filing fee

Contact the circuit court to find out the exact amount for the filing fee. After the clerk has filed your change of name request, ask the clerk to set a date and time for your court hearing.

Step 5 – Consent of Other Parent

If you are the only parent residing in the county where the change of name is being filed, or if you are the only parent asking for the child’s name to be changed, you must inform the other parent of the request and obtain their consent. If the other parent agrees to the request for a change of name, have the individual fill out a Consent for Change of Name (Minor Child(ren)) form. The other parent must sign the document in front of a notary public or court clerk. A nonlawyer who has assisted the other parent in completing the form must fill out the bottommost area of the consent form (if applicable). Make copies of the form once it has been completed and signed.

If the other parent does not consent to the request to change the child’s name and you know where the individual lives, you must serve the other parent with a copy of the petition and the hearing information by personal service. Personal service is when a deputy sheriff or private process server serves the individual.

If you do not know where the other parent lives, you must serve the individual with a copy of the petition and the hearing information by constructive service. Constructive service is when the other party is notified by publication in a newspaper or by a posting of a notice at a designated location.

Review the General Information for Self-Represented Litigants pamphlet to learn more about the process of serving the other party. You can also contact your local circuit court for assistance on the topic.

Step 6 – Final Judgement of Change of Name

The Final Judgement of Change of Name (Minor Child(ren)) must be completed and presented to a judge on the date of your hearing. Fill in the form with the relevant petition information. Leave the second page unfilled as this portion of the form will be completed by a circuit judge.

Step 7 – Attend Hearing

Attend your hearing and present the Final Judgement of Change of Name (Minor Child(ren)) to the circuit judge. The judge will consider the reason for the change of name and determine whether or not the request is valid. If approved, the judge will sign the Final Judgment and return it to you. Ask a court clerk to make a certified copy of the Final Judgement. The original and certified copy can be used as legal proof that the child’s name has changed. You should also make copies of the Final Judgement for your personal records.


ABOUT SSL CERTIFICATES