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Washington Firearm Bill of Sale Form

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Washington Firearm Bill of Sale Form

Updated September 14, 2023

A Washington firearm bill of sale is a legal document that proves a firearm has been legally sold and purchased in the State of Washington. The form will provide valuable information pertaining to the change of ownership of the firearm, the identifying factors regarding the firearm, and information about the seller and the buyer. Notarization is required.

Table of Contents

Privately Selling a Firearm

A person does not need a firearms dealer license in order to privately sell a firearm in Washington. However, even in a private sale, the seller is required to utilize a licensed dealer to conduct the required federal background check on the potential buyer.[1]

Prohibited from Buying

The following persons are prohibited from owning and purchasing a firearm in the state of Washington:[2]

  • A person, whether an adult or juvenile, is guilty of the crime of unlawful possession of a firearm in the first degree, if the person owns, accesses, has in the person’s custody, control, or possession, or receives any firearm after having previously been convicted or found not guilty by reason of insanity in Washington or elsewhere of any serious offense.
  • A person, whether an adult or juvenile, is guilty of the crime of unlawful possession of a firearm in the second degree, if the person does not qualify for the crime of unlawful possession of a firearm in the first degree, and the person owns, accesses, has in the person’s custody, control, or possession, or receives any firearm:
    • After having previously been convicted or found not guilty by reason of insanity in Washington or elsewhere of:
      • Any felony not specifically listed as prohibiting firearm possession;
      • Any of the following crimes when committed by one family or household member against another or by one intimate partner against another, as those terms are defined by the statutes in effect at the time of the commission of the crime, committed on or after July 1, 1993: Assault in the fourth degree, coercion, stalking, reckless endangerment, criminal trespass in the first degree, or violation of the provisions of a protection order or no-contact order restraining the person or excluding the person from a residence;
      • Harassment when committed by one family or household member against another or by one intimate partner against another, as those terms are defined by the statutes in effect at the time of the commission of the crime, committed on or after June 7, 2018;
      • Any of the following misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor crimes: Domestic violence; stalking; cyberstalking; cyber harassment that contains threatening language or is made repeatedly or anonymously; harassment; aiming or discharging a firearm unlawfully; unlawful carrying or handling of a firearm; animal cruelty in the second degree; or any prior drug or alcohol offense committed within seven years of a conviction for any other prior drug or alcohol offense;
      • A violation of the provisions of a protection order restraining the person or excluding the person from a residence, when committed by one family or household member against another or by one intimate partner against another, committed on or after July 1, 2022; or
      • A violation of the provisions of an order to surrender and prohibit weapons, an extreme risk protection order, or the provisions of any other protection order or no-contact order restraining the person or excluding the person from a residence, committed on or after July 23, 2023;
    • During any period of time that the person is subject to a protection order, no-contact order, or restraining order by a court that:
      • Was issued after a hearing for which the person received actual notice, and at which the person had an opportunity to participate, whether the court then issues a full order or reissues a temporary order;
      • Restrains the person from harassing, stalking, or threatening the person protected under the order or child of the person or protected person, or others identified in the order, or engaging in other conduct that would place the protected person in reasonable fear of bodily injury to the protected person or child or others identified in the order; and
      • Includes a finding that the person represents a credible threat to the physical safety of the protected person or child or others identified in the order, or by its terms explicitly prohibits the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against the protected person or child or other persons that would reasonably be expected to cause bodily injury; or
      • Includes an order requiring the person to surrender all firearms and prohibiting the person from accessing, having in his or her custody or control, possessing, purchasing, receiving, or attempting to purchase or receive, firearms; or
      • After having previously been involuntarily committed based on a mental disorder, unless their right to possess a firearm has been restored;
    • After having previously been involuntarily committed for mental health treatment, unless their right to possess a firearm has been restored;
    • After the dismissal of criminal charges based on incompetency to stand trial when the court has made a finding indicating that the defendant has a history of one or more violent acts, unless their right to possess a firearm has been restored;
    • If the person is under eighteen years of age; and/or
    • If the person is free on bond or personal recognizance pending trial, appeal, or sentencing for a serious offense.

Registering a Firearm

Washington has no law requiring the state registration of privately owned firearms.

Concealed Carry

Any resident of Washington must have a valid Concealed Pistol License to carry a concealed weapon in the state.[3]

How to Apply

An applicant for a Concealed Pistol License must be a minimum of twenty-one (21) years of age.[4]

Step 1 – Obtain a Concealed Pistol License Application from the applicant’s Local Education Agency.

Step 2 – Complete the application and attach the following:

  • One (1) color passport-style photograph of the applicant; and
  • One (1) complete set of fingerprints.

Step 3 – Submit the application to the applicant’s local municipality or county sheriff’s office.

Step 4 – Pay the $36 application fee.[5]

Step 5 – Pass a federal background check.

Step 6 – The issuing authority will approve or deny the application within thirty (30) days of receiving it.[6]

Reciprocity

Washington recognizes the concealed carry permit of any state that recognizes Washington’s in return. The following states have permits that are not recognized by Washington: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode, Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.[7]

Sources

  1. WA Rev Code § 9.41.113
  2. WA Rev Code § 9.41.040
  3. WA Rev Code § 9.41.050(1)(a)
  4. WA Rev Code § 9.41.070(1)(c)
  5. WA Rev Code § 9.41.070(5)
  6. WA Rev Code § 9.41.070(1)
  7. WA Rev Code § 9.41.073