Medical School Letter of Intent

Updated June 01, 2022

medical school letter of intent is a letter sent by an individual expressing a desire to attend a particular educational institution for the study of medicine. Not to be confused with a letter of interest, a letter of intent should only be sent to a medical school if this is the applicant’s top choice for their education. (A letter of interest, on the other hand, is a letter that expresses a high level of interest in attending a medical school.) A medical school LOI doesn’t need to be included in an admissions package but is a letter sent to the admissions committee after the prospective student has sent in their application and gone through the interviewing process. This type of letter of intent should include the following general information: gratitude for consideration (opening and closing paragraphs); why the applicant prefers this school above others; what value and contributions the applicant will bring the school/program; any updates since interview/last communication; and a statement of clear intent to attend if admitted.

What is Medical School?

Medical school is an educational institution with programs and curricula guiding students towards a degree in medicine. There are almost 200 medical schools in the US, some harder to get into than others. Admission is based upon applicants’ GPA, MCAT score, admissions package (including an essay), interview, clinical experience, and extracurricular/volunteering activities. Once a student is enrolled, their education is typically divided into two phases; preclinical (classroom and lab) and clinical (hospital/clinic rotations). During a medical student’s time in school, they will be taught the art and science of medicine. Topics such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, behavioral science, and neuroscience will be covered so the students are well-versed in the normal structure and function of humans. Furthermore, courses in microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and pathology are provided to teach diseases and abnormalities of the body’s structure and function. The clinical phase of medical education will have students learning hands-on how to interact with real patients and perform basic medical procedures. The student will spend their days shadowing a certified physician (resident) in a hospital or medical clinic. Upon successful completion of medical school, a medical school graduate will complete at least one year of a residency program (postgraduate training in a hospital or clinic). After the residency program, the student must pass the Step/Level 3 USMLE and COMLEX exams before becoming a licensed medical doctor.

Medical School Letter of Intent – Sample

September 25, 2019

Dear David Geffen School of Medicine Admissions Committee,

I would like to extend my gratitude to the committee for allowing me the opportunity to join the student body of The David Geffen School of Medicine. UCLA is my top choice for medical school, and I will attend without question if I am accepted. Since my interview, I have only gained further admiration for your school and am very eager to bring my passion to the medical program and learn under the tutelage of the esteemed faculty. I have a great reverence Dr. Dennis Slamon’s research and development that earned him the Lasker Award this year. He is part of the reason for my application to UCLA, and I plan on completing a fellowship in hematology and medical oncology (hopefully at UCLA as well) post-residency.

My interest in the field of hematology-oncology stems partly from the passing of my mother after a lengthy battle with breast cancer. As I mentioned in my application, I became a member of Advocates for Science (AIS) – a Susan G. Komen program – shortly thereafter. The reason I’m able to make a difference in this program is the same reason I believe my acceptance to UCLA would be beneficial to both myself and the school: my undying commitment to improve the lives of those with, and at risk of, breast cancer. As an AIS member, my skills, talents, and personal experiences were best suited to educating others about breast cancer as well as research and research advocacy. Most of all, I was fortunate to learn even more about the science behind breast cancer, the research process, and current projects.

The David Geffen School of Medicine would be my number one choice because I believe it’s a school that will provide me with the highest level of education and the tools necessary for me to make a difference. I want to help change the world, just as Dr. Slamon did. UCLA will have a completely dedicated and capable student in me, and I know I will make the school proud.

I’d be happy to answer any other questions you have or provide more detailed information if you need it. I appreciate you taking the time and look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

[Signature]
Jennifer Bloom
jebloom@gmail.com
(555) 980-0088